Results for suicide

Filters

Wow! 17 Results for suicide found

Korean American Adoptee Suicide Prevention Campaign Teaser

September is National Suicide Prevention Awareness Month. Adoptees are four times more likely to attempt suicide than non-adoptees.

Embracing Koreanness in Black America

As a second generation Korean American, I grew up in Chicago with a single father that had a love affair with alcohol and the American dream. My mother committed suicide when I was too young to understand.

Heart & Seoul: Scenarios

Scenario one: Young boy’s mother dies of a long drawn out illness; just a few months later, his father also dies of a sudden and quick illness.

The Hardest Part About Being a Teenage Adoptee

Adoptees are four times more likely to attempt suicide than non-adoptees.

The Struggle Between Love and Hate

Recently, there’s been some attention given to adoptees who have been deported back to Korea, such as Adam Crapser and Phillip Clay.

Dju Hyun Park – Part 1

Dju Hyun Park grew up in a wealthy family in North Korea, but affluence did not ensure an easy life.

Book Review of Matthew Salesses’ “The Hundred Year Flood”

It is a story that is steered in subtle yet powerful ways by the psychological effects of adoption yet flawlessly transcends being pigeonholed into the adoption literature category.

Second Chances in Tijuana: Profile of Dong-Jin Eastern Kang Sim

At age twelve, Dong-Jin Eastern Kang Sim huddled in a tiny cell in Mexico City with his mother and thirteen-year-old brother. They were the only Asians in the jail.

Love Beyond Measure: Pega Crimbchin

Late one evening while mourning her late husband, Pega Crimbshin (nee Ock Soon Lee), 81, of Cabot, Pennsylvania, found a box that he had handcrafted and shown to her in January 1954. He had informed her that they contained important papers.

julia-katz-sq
Bridges

In popular culture, Asian Americans always seemed concerned with building bridges from old country to new country, first generation to second generation.

Turn to the East, by Caroline Singer and C. Le Roy Baldridge

As a piece of “living history,” this fascinating large-format volume brings together the narrative of Caroline Singer and artwork of her husband, Roy Baldridge, of their year (likely 1924-25) in the Far East, including Japan, Korea and China.

The Queens of Ktown by Angela Mi Young Hur

Told from the vantage point of the main character Cora, at age 16 and in her late 20s, the themes of this story are familiar.

miss kim logo
Miss Kim’s Defiance
Meeting Sahm-chone

Every Sunday, my mother cooks a huge meal and my siblings and their families gather at her house to enjoy it.

I Have the Right to Destroy Myself, by Young-ha Kim

In the fast-paced, high-urban landscape of Seoul, C and K are brothers who have fallen in love with the same woman—Se-yeon—who tears at both of them as they all try desperately to find real connection in an atomized world.

The Waves, by Kang Shin-jae

Young-sil is a ten-year-old girl in the village of Wonjin during the Japanese occupation.

The Lost Mother, by Iltang (Kim TaeShin)

An important memoir of a famed Korean-Japanese painter, Kim Tae Shin, who eventually became a monk, following the footsteps of his equally famed mother, Ilyeong, who was a poet and feminist during the Japanese occupation.

×
|